Introducing The N-Acetyl Cysteine Cleanse



I know what you are thinking. Richard Anderson's cleanse program is obnoxiously pricey. That is not the only problem with it. His herbal formula is proprietary — he refuses to divulge the exact recipe, and you can only get it from him. Another problem is that the effectiveness of his herbal formula will wear off very quickly if you take it too often. I found this to be very inconvenient and time consuming.

I found another way.

In the morning on an empty stomach, I take 600mg N-Acetyl Cysteine with a glass of apple juice and some cayenne pepper (swallow NAC pill with apple juice first, then ingest cayenne pepper so cayenne pepper won't make you choke on pill). I don't eat until at least a couple of hours later. When I do eat (for lunch and supper), I eat a strict mucusless diet. I also take a dose of psyllium once or twice a day that is at least three hours away from each other and at least one and one half hours away from the supplements. I take enemas as needed.

It works spectacularly well — even better than Richard Anderson's cleanse program I think. I've seen it remove substantial chunks of mucoid plaque that his cleanse program failed to remove. If you choose to swallow the red pill then click here to see some pictures I took of some of it.

Even though the active ingredient is the N-Acetyl Cysteine, it is just as important I think to take the cayenne pepper and apple juice with it. I could swear that the cayenne pepper makes it work better. I think Richard Anderson is right that cayenne pepper acts as a catalyst increasing the effectiveness of other herbs taken with it. Concerning the apple juice, I have a story to tell you about it. But that's for another post. For now it is sufficient to say that it gives it a little extra kick sometimes. And be sure you eat a strict mucusless diet or else it won't work good.

This N-Acetyl Cysteine Cleanse is a respectable alternative, I think, to herbal based cleansers: (a) it only costs me 12 US dollars a month (b) it is non-proprietary — the recipe is open sourced, and you can get the ingredients from a pharmacy you trust (c) while abstaining from taking herbal based cleansers you can take this in the meantime and vice versa.

It is not without potential problems though. Like any drug, there is a potential for side effects. I must inform you (while speaking at a rapid rate so you can't hear me clearly) that N-Acetyl Cysteine can, at rare times in some people, cause nausea, vomiting, rashes, or fever.

Some of you know where I got this idea from. Wallace and Whittle used N-acetylcysteine to disintegrate mucoid cap that they experimentally made to form over ex vivo chambered gastric rat mucosa. This convinces me more than ever that the so-called mucoid plaque that cleansers remove is actually mucoid cap.



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