Mucoid Plaque is Necrotic Tissue Stupid

What mucoid plaque actually is has been hidden in plain site — and everyone has been too dumb to recognize it. In case you did not know, Benard Jensen named his book "Tissue Cleansing Through Bowel Management" because he claims his cleansing program will remove "old underactive tissue".[1] If you look up necrotic tissue in a book of wound healing, you will see that there are two types: slough and eschar. Slough is moist, less necrotic, mucoid, loosely adherent, and yellowish-brown or tan whereas eschar is dry, more necrotic, leathery, firmly adherent, and either gray, black, brown, or olive-green.[2] Now believe it or not, Robert Gray, in his book The Colon Health Handbook actually described the difference between slough and eschar — he just didn't realize it. He described two types of mucoid plaque: putrefactive matter and postputrefactive matter. He said that "putrefactive matter" (it's actually slough) is moist, still decaying, and easily removable whereas "postputrefactive matter" (it's actually eschar) is dry, no longer putrefying, rubbery, glued firmly onto the colon, and is usually grey, black, dark brown, or dark green in color.[3]

Generally speaking, textbooks on wound healing describe necrotic tissue as "black", "brown", "gray", "yellow", "olive-green", "hardened", "soft", "mucoid", "stringy", "leathery", "putrid" and "foul".[4] This is exactly how Richard Anderson, Robert Gray, Benard Jensen, and Victor Earl Irons clinically described mucoid plaque.[5] Fibrin often mixes in with necrotic tissue. It is "sticky" and "rubbery", and may be visible as "strands" or "thick sheets".[6] Notice that "sticky" and "rubbery" is precisely how mucoid plaque has been described.[5] Notice also that Walter Bastedo [7] described mucoid plaque as "strings" or "sheets":

"When one sees the dirty gray, brown or blackish sheets, strings and rolled up wormlike masses of tough mucus with a rotten or dead-fish odor that are obtained by colon irrigations, one does not wonder that these patients feel ill and that they obtain relief and show improvement as the result of the irrigation."

This is the same mucoid plaque stuff that Richard Anderson described: he once witnessed his friend eliminate a "blackish grey snake-like mass".[8] Richard mentioned that it can have a foul odor,[5] which I assume is the same odor that Walter Bastedo described: a rotten or dead-fish odor, which is necrotic tissue.

Richard Anderson is really foolish. He thinks this:

Endoscopic photograph of mucoid plaque. Its from the fourth edition of "Clinical Gastroenterology" by Howard M. Spiro.

is an example of mucoid plaque.[9] I agree it is, but the caption under the photo identifies it as "necrotic mucosa" that is "sloughing off extensively".[10] That would mean then that mucoid plaque is necrotic tissue. I pointed this out to him in an email, but he disagrees. He stands by his unsupported theory that mucoid plaque is coagulated mucin. Seriously, isn't that spectacularly stupid?

References

[1] You can read his book for free here. He says that mucoid plaque "is loaded with old drugs, tissue and morbid substances" and that his cleansing program will remove "old underactive tissue".

[2] I gathered this from page 314 of the fourth edition of Oxford Textbook of Palliative Nursing, page 197 of the third edition of Wound Care: A Collaborative Practice Manual for Health Professionals, and page 29 of Smart textiles for medicine and healthcare: Materials, systems and applications.

[3] See pages 15, 56, 57 and 67 of the twelfth revised edition of his book The Colon Health Handbook.

[4] I gathered this from page 197 of the third edition of Wound Care: A Collaborative Practice Manual for Health Professionals and page 150 of the second edition of Comprehensive Wound Management.

[5] Within pages 92 through 94 of Richard Anderson's book Cleanse & Purify Thyself Book Two he describes mucoid plaque as "soft", "gray", "yellow", "green", "light brown to black", "blackish green", "foul", "mucoid" and like "wet leather or rubber". On page 81 of Richard Anderson's book Cleanse & Purify Thyself Book One he describes mucoid plaque as like "long leather or rubber-like rope". On either page 8, 67, or 30 of Robert Gray's twelfth revised edition of The Colon Health Handbook he describes mucoid plaque as "sticky", "rubbery", "putrefactive", "black", "dark brown", "dark green", "hardened", "grey" or "mucoid". In Bernard Jensen's book Tissue Cleansing Through Bowel Management he describes mucoid plaque as "black", "foul", "putrid", "stringy", "sticky" and "hard as truck tire rubber". In Victor Earl Iron's booklet The Destruction of Your Own Natural Protective Mechanism he describes mucoid plaque as "foul smelling", "stringy", "grey", "brown", "black" and like "hardened rubber".

[6] I got this from page 340 of the fourteenth edition of Tidy's Physiotherapy.

[7] See the 1932 article called "Colon irrigations: Their administration, therapeutic application and dangers". It's actually a subtitle under the main title of "Council on Physical Therapy". You can get it here. It's in The Journal of the American Medical Association and is volume 98 and number 9. Go to pages 734-736. It was written by Walter Bastedo.

[8] See page 81 of Richard Anderson's book Cleanse & Purify Thyself Book One.

[9] See page 99 of Richard Anderson's book Cleanse & Purify Thyself Book Two.

[10] See plate 83 in the fourth edition of Clinical Gastroenterology by Howard M. Spiro.

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