A Healthy Gut Microbiota Makes Your Lungs Immune To Viruses



Are you worried about the coronavirus? Then you should make sure that you have a healthy gut microbiota. An international team of scientists has recently discovered that the healthy type of bacteria in the gut keep the lungs immune from viruses.[1] It does this at a distance. They call it 'spooky action at a distance'. No, I'm just joking; they don't. But the gut bacteria do somehow send a signal, which in turn increases interferon signaling in lung stromal cells. The exact nature of the signal from the gut to the lung is currently unknown, but there are several hypotheses. In any event, this interferon signaling is fine-tuned to elicit antiviral protection early on while avoiding tissue damage due to inflammation.

“This and previous studies demonstrate that microbiota-driven signals can act at multiple levels, inducing an antiviral state in non-immune cells to control infection early on, and enhancing the functionality of immune cells later in infection,” Dr. Wack said.

Now as I figure it, you will never have a healthy microbiota if you have alot of mucoid cap in your gastrointestinal tract. As I proved to you in my previous post, mucoid cap is essentially eschar or slough mixed in with the adherent mucus layer. When the adherent mucus layer becomes contaminated with eschar or slough, good bacteria cannot live inside of it; only bad bacteria.[2]

So the best personal protection against the coronavirus pandemic is not to inject yourself with disinfectant as president Trump wants you to do. That's spectacularly stupid. The best personal protection is to eat a mucusless diet, remove all the mucoid cap out of your gastrointestinal system, and take probiotics and prebiotics. This should be done well before you become infected, by the way.

References

[1] See Study: Gut Bacteria Stimulate Antiviral Signals in Lung Cells to Protect against Flu Virus and Gut microbes protect against flu virus infection in mice.

[2] See textbook called "Wound Care Essentials: Practice Principles". The ISBN-13 is 978-1-58255-469-3. It's the 2nd edition. The authors are Sharon Baranoski & Elizabeth A. Ayello. You can read it for free at google books. On page 119 it says that eschar or slough "serves as a proinflammatory stimulus and a culture medium for bacterial growth".



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